Working the Edge

The Bird Sings Oral Tradition Song Library

Working the Edge

Oh my, this song took my heart from the first I heard it, and the harmonies were such a delicious challenge to craft. This is another heart-melter from my gifted songwriter friend Glen Phillips, written in 2018 and as yet unreleased on a label. And the chorus is among the first Arabic in my song repertoire.

Composer & Copyright

Original song © Glen Phillips, arranged for Wholehearted Chorus with permission and in collaboration by Lisa G. Littlebird. Please support the artist by purchasing his music.

Recording

Recorded by Glen Phillips & Lisa G. Littlebird, shared with permission.

 

Lyrics

Verse 1: If I named you, would I be misled?
Is it just to claim you? Working the edge
When I praise you, does it please your ear?
Is it all in the giving?
Is it all in the giving?

Chorus: Alhamdulillah (x5)
(Translation from Arabic: “All praises & thanks be to Allah” – an expression of relief)

Verse 2: A humble pilgrim, traveler
Seeking wisdom, preaching love
And if an answer never comes,
It was all in the giving
It was all in the giving

Chorus

Verse 3: If I named you, would I be misled?
Is it just to claim you? Working the edge
When I praise you, does it even reach your ear?
It is all in the giving

It is all in the giving

Chorus x2

Teaching Notes

This song is pure magic, and deceptively tricky! Most lyrics are held by a soloist, with the choral arrangement consisting only of a simple line repetition at the end of each verse plus a single word in the chorus. Even still, the melodic line (in the low voice) and the harmonies all take serious patience and repetition in learning. There are many notes and nuanced deviations from line to line, with few exact repetitions.

Key: This recording is in the key of B.

8

Level of teaching speed/ difficulty (1 = very easy, 10 = very challenging)

1 Comment
  • michael lojkovic
    Posted at 02:31h, 11 March Reply

    Just asking here cuz i be curious. Normally, a chorus repeats 4 times; this beautiful song of praise repeats five times. is this in honor of traditional Arabic songs? Is there significance in that number, as opposed to four?
    like i said, curious…
    ps–i can’t wait to ‘audition’ for this!

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